Cooee Bay | CQ Towns & Places

Cooee Bay | CQ Towns & Places

Cooee Bay & Wreck Point

Access

Cooee Bay is a major centre on the Capricorn Coast and is easily reached from Rockhampton, Yeppoon, and Emu Park. It is located 41 kms northeast of Rockhampton City, and 18 kms north of Emu Park.

Cooee Bay is a picturesque seaside community. Adjacent to the town of Yeppoon, the difference is noticeable as you drive over Ross Creek and enter a smaller village where the pace is more laid back. Around 1000 people call Ross Creek home.

Cooee Bay is bounded in the south by Lammermoor Beach, in the west by Taranganba, and north by Yeppoon. It takes in the seaward bank of Ross Creek, and the full length of the scenic Matthew Flinders Drive which goes over the top of Wreck Point.

Its coastline encompasses two sandy coves, including Fisherman’s Beach and Ocean Parade, which are amongst the most desirable addresses on the Capricorn Coast for their uninterrupted access and view to the Pacific Ocean.

Cooee Bay features two rocky headlands, the remnants of long-ago volcanic activity in the region. The most famous of these is Wreck Point which includes a new lookout and stunning views across Keppel Bay. On a clear winter’s day, it is possible to see as far south as the mountains of Broadmount near the mouth of the Fitzroy River, and the ranges of Byfield in the north.

History

Cooee Bay, along with all the other seaward land between Mulambin and Yeppoon, was originally staked out by Robert Ross and family in the 1860s.

Very little development happened in Cooee Bay until the early 1900s, as much of the land was swamp, and regularly inundated by king tides and summer storms.

In recent years, Cooee Bay is enjoying serious reinvention as a prestigious location due to its close proximity to the sea, and to schools and other facilities in neighbouring Yeppoon.

Photo Gallery: Cooee Bay

If you enjoy this type of article, you can find more on the Central Queensland Places page. Feel free to leave any related comments at the end of this page.

Andrew Thompson, editor | historian

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